A single device, a million opportunities.

Some time has passed since Microsoft has announced its new gadget HoloLens, people had the chance to go through their daily lives with all of their visionary information in mind and thus one or another might have experienced some activities or situations where a device like Microsoft’s new gadget could appear desirable.

Microsoft HoloLens - Possibilities

Only one of a million possibilities Microsoft itself has shown in a marketing video

If you did not have had your “HoloLens moment” until now, maybe the article of columnist Jurica Dujmovic for MarketWatch may be an inspiration for you. From an economic point of view he sheds light on Hololens’ possible impact on the consumer market as well as media usage and points out where “the first augmented-reality device done right” could really be an improvement:

“HoloLens will impact multiple markets, ranging from home entertainment to mobile devices; virtually everything with a screen will likely take a cue from the technology within HoloLens. Your fridge will interface with it, showing you a see-through view of groceries, along with a visual representation of the expiration dates, and the option to “check mark” individual items and add them to your shopping list. That is, without opening the fridge.”

via Microsoft’s HoloLens actually could be a game changer

But his list of opportunities and possibilities does not stop at your fridge. He talks about:

  • Changing wall colors at your home
  • Seeing fantasy scenes when looking out of your window
  • Experiencing different real world places when looking out of your window
  • Transforming your child’s bedroom into an enchanted forest instead of a traditional good night story
  • Single- or multiplayer gaming in your living room as an alternative to classical board games
  • Integration of holograms into your car and your view of the outside
  • Surgeons that use it for complex operations (if you have a special interest in medical topics we recommend the article “Drone Surgery and HoloLens: Hello 2015”  by Zev Ginzburg, UX Research Copywriter at Codal Inc.)
  • Improving the tidiness of your office working environment
  • Creating impressive art installations on almost empty walls in almost empty halls
  • Enhancing education by visual breakdown and vivid demonstration of complex subjects

Finally the authors sums it up very accurately:

“Really, HoloLens has the potential to change the way we perceive the world around us, and to truly extend and augment reality. Depending on the final product and the limits of our imagination, we may reach, or even surpass, many elements of the imaginary “Star Trek” holodeck technology.”

via Microsoft’s HoloLens actually could be a game changer

So did you find your favorite HoloLens scenario? Or do you even see more than the author? Or do you disagree and do not see any opportunities for your life in Microsoft’s new technology? We would love to hear your opinion in the comments section.

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3D objects vs. holograms

We have already mentioned that HoloLens doesn’t create holograms by itself. The so-called holograms are actually 3D objects made entirely out of light. By using Microsoft’s special goggles, these virtual 3D objects are projected onto our field of vision.

In contrast, researcher Xuewu Xu and some of his colleagues  from Data Storage Institute in Singapore succeeded in developing a method to create “real” holograms.  Engadget’s Felix Knoke shared a German article about the topic here and attempts to get a demo video from Xuewu Xu and his colleagues. Basically, they explain their approach in the following way:

hologram“We propose a new approach to spatiotemporally multiplex sub-holograms and stream hologram data in parallel by using multiple spatial light modulators (SLMs) to increase the spatiotemporal resolution of holographic display system.

With the proposed approach, we have achieved a spatiotemporal resolution of 4.5 × 1010 pixel/s, as compared with 1.89 × 109 pixel/s of a single SLM. Each frame of computer-generated hologram video has a pixel count of 378 Mpixels and is divided into 288 sub-holograms, each of 1.31 Mpixels.

During the playback of holographic video, these sub-holograms are spatiotemporally multiplexed and streamed in parallel to form the integrated hologram within 16.67 ms, which enables full-color holographic video display with a 10-in. diagonal at a hologram data frame rate of 60 frames per second (fps).

New SLM devices with higher spatiotemporal resolution need to be developed in order to meet the data bandwidth requirement of about 1012–1014 pixel/s for future 3D holographic displays.”

via So gehen Hologramme richtig – Engadget Deutschland.

Nevertheless, HoloLens offers a great possibility to blend virtual objects into our physical reality. Even if HoloLens doesn’t create holograms by definition, Microsoft avoids negative connotations connected with AR and establishes best conditions for HoloLens to be accepted by potential customers.

Phil Spencer about HoloLens and Gaming

Arbeiter Total/leuna

Apart from Onsight and HoloStudio, the gaming industry is especially interested in Holobuilder.

The demo is based on Minecraft and allows the user to create virtual components in the physical reality.  This possibility becomes technically feasible with the new HPU processor.

Microsoft’s head of Xbox, Phil Spencer, explains the holographic processing unit:

 “The HPU gives us the ability to understand where you’re looking, to understand your gestures, to understand your voice, to spatially map your environment, to run without wires … all in real-time”

To read the full interview, click the link below:

Gaming Will Eventually Invade Microsoft’s HoloLens.

Exploring Project Baraboo

explore

WIRED together with chief inventor Alex Kipman explored Project Baraboo – which is the official codename for HoloLens.

As we are all curious about the new wearable, Kipman explains how holograms come into existance:

“To create Project HoloLens’ images, light particles bounce around millions of times in the so-called light engine of the device. Then the photons enter the goggles’ two lenses, where they ricochet between layers of blue, green and red glass before they reach the back of your eye. “When you get the light to be at the exact angle,” Kipman tells me, “that’s where all the magic comes in.”

For more detailed information about the Hands-On with HoloLens and an in-depth look into Kipman’s philosophy of holographic computing read the full article!

Project HoloLens: Our Exclusive Hands-On With Microsoft’s Holographic Goggles | WIRED.